Digital Analogues (part 5): Lessons from Animal Law, Continued


The last post in this series on “Digital Analogues”–which explores the various areas of law that courts could use as a model for liability when AI systems cause harm–examined animal liability law.  Under traditional animal liability law, the owner of a “wild” animal is strictly liable for any injury or damage caused by that animal.  For domesticated animals, however, an owner is only liable if that particular animal had shown dangerous tendencies and the owner failed to take adequate precautions.

So what lessons might animal liability law offer for AI? Well, if we believe that AI systems are inherently risky (or if we just want to be extra cautious), we could treat all AI systems like “wild” animals and hold their owners strictly liable for harms that they cause. That would certainly encourage safety precautions, but it might also stifle innovation.  Such a blanket rule would seem particularly unfair for AI systems whose functions are so narrow that they do not present much risk to anyone. It would seem somewhat silly to impose a blanket rule that treats AlphaGo as if it is just as dangerous as an autonomous weapon system.

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Too smart for our own good?

Source: Dilbert Comic Strip on 1992-02-11 | Dilbert by Scott Adams


Two stories this past week caught my eye.  The first is Nvidia’s revelation of the new, AI-focused Tesla P100 computer chip.  Introduced at April’s annual GPU Technology Conference, the P100 is the largest computer chip in history in terms of the number of transistors, “the product of around $2.5 billion worth of research and development at the hands of thousands of computer engineers.”  Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang said that the chip was designed and dedicated “to accelerating AI; dedicated to accelerating deep learning.”  But the revolutionary potential of the P100 is dependent on AI engineers coming up with new algorithms that can leverage the full range chip’s capabilities.  Absent such advances, Huang says that the P100 would end up being the “world’s most expensive brick.”

The development of the P100 demonstrates, in case we needed a reminder, the immense technical advances that have been made in computing power in recent years and highlights the possibilities those developments raise for AI systems that can be designed to perform (and even learn to perform) an ever-increasing variety of human tasks.  But an essay by Adam Elkus that appeared this week in Slate questions whether we have the ability–or for that matter, will ever have the ability–to program an AI system with human values.

I’ll open with a necessary criticism: much of Elkus’s essay seems like an extended effort to annoy Stuart Russell.  (The most amusing moment in the essay is when Elkus suggested that Russell, who literally wrote the book on AI, needs to bone up on his AI history.) Elkus devotes much of his virtual ink to cobbling together out-of-context snippets from a year-old interview that Russell gave to Quanta Magazine and using those snippets to form strawman arguments that Elkus then attributes to Russell.  But despite the strawmen and snide comments, Elkus makes some good points on the vexing issue of how to program ethics and morality into AI systems.

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Tay the Racist Chatbot: Who is responsible when a machine learns to be evil?

Warning


By far the most entertaining AI news of the past week was the rise and rapid fall of Microsoft’s teen-girl-imitation Twitter chatbot, Tay, whose Twitter tagline described her as “Microsoft’s AI fam* from the internet that’s got zero chill.”

(* Btw, I’m officially old–I had to consult Urban Dictionary to confirm that I was correctly understanding what “fam” and “zero chill” meant. “Fam” means “someone you consider family” and “no chill” means “being particularly reckless,” in case you were wondering.)

The remainder of the tagline declared: “The more you talk the smarter Tay gets.”

Or not.  Within 24 hours of going online, Tay started saying some weird stuff.  And then some offensive stuff.  And then some really offensive stuff.  Like calling Zoe Quinn a “stupid whore.”  And saying that the Holocaust was “made up.”  And saying that black people (she used a far more offensive term) should be put in concentration camps.  And that she supports a Mexican genocide.  The list goes on.

So what happened?  How could a chatbot go full Goebbels within a day of being switched on?  Basically, Tay was designed to develop its conversational skills by using machine learning, most notably by analyzing and incorporating the language of tweets sent to her by human social media users. What Microsoft apparently did not anticipate is that Twitter trolls would intentionally try to get Tay to say offensive or otherwise inappropriate things.  At first, Tay simply repeated the inappropriate things that the trolls said to her.  But before too long, Tay had “learned” to say inappropriate things without a human goading her to do so.  This was all but inevitable given that, as Tay’s tagline suggests, Microsoft designed her to have no chill.

Now, anyone who is familiar with the social media cyberworld should not be surprised that this happened–of course a chatbot designed with “zero chill” would learn to be racist and inappropriate because the Twitterverse is filled with people who say racist and inappropriate things.  But fascinatingly, the media has overwhelmingly focused on the people who interacted with Tay rather than on the people who designed Tay when examining why the Degradation of Tay happened.

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